Oysters and okra are fried in a spicy panko & flour breading for this classic New Orleans sandwich.

As far back as I can remember,

my first love for sandwiches began in middle school. Freddie’s Sandwiches, the little sandwich shop that could situated on the corner of Francisco Street in San Francisco. 

Well…here I am!  Back in the cooking game after our 6th move in August.  I will not go into much details …but, I am pretty sure this is THE ONE!

kitchen_2 kitchen_3

Of course, in my new little kitchen, the first meal I made (by request from our teen) was Pork Sinigang (Filipino sour soup or stew).  A staple in any Filipino home, and quite the favorite for many–young and old.  Thus, on the topic of Filipino food, comes the wondrous Pork Adobo

Here’s a classic sandwich for a distinctive palette…a great combination of sweet and savory, yet light sandwich served on a grilled French Baguette.  A perfect paring alongside a bright, crispy green salad!

Let’s face it, I just can’t resist the scent of fresh-baked bread in the oven.  However, seldom as it may, I do fall short on time because of reasons X, Y & Z; -or- our little guy just can’t wait for that dough to rise in two hours; only to wait yet another hour after kneading the bread, er, ummm…you know the drill. 

Hmm, where do I begin?  Beautiful Breads & Fabulous Fillings (The Best Sandwiches in America) by Margaux Sky. I don’t quite remember when and where I found this book but I love it!  An older recipe book written in 2006 and I purchased it about two years ago when we first began our cooking and baking frenzy at home.  There are a couple of bread recipes in this book I really like and one in particular that my older son has made in the past.

I, on the other hand, have only tried ‘baking’ a few months ago, when we moved into our new home.  Yesterday, I took out this cookbook that has remained untouched in the pantry for about the same duration as when we moved in!  Upon the revisit, I immediately opened it to the same bread recipe I have been wanting to bake for myself…Sweet French Loaf.

About a week ago I received a personal autographed copy of the Heirloom Cookbook from The Beekman Boys.  I also took the liberty to purchase an autographed copy of The Bucolic Plague.  Just as with any new cookbook and/or book I purchase, I could not wait to peruse through the crisp pages of both books.

 

Ever in the mood for some down and dirty eating at the comfort of home, of course…well here’s your chance!  I can’t so much give you the exact type of spices I used to marinate the ground turkey because I strongly believe in trying to make things uniquely your own.  Below is just an impromptu guide on the making of this dish.  In the spirit of hunger, I hope you will find it devouring on days when you feel like just being yourself.

Back in the ’70s I lived in large apartment building in San Francisco, in the corner of Gough and Market.  At least once a week, my parents and I would walk up to the supermarket several blocks away.  There were a couple of things I often took notice of along the way–the Old Mint Building and a mom and pop Vietnamese sandwich dive where from about 11 until 2pm people would line up to get their sandwich fix.  I had no idea what the sandwiches were called at the time, but I do recall a few ingredients that stuck to my mind: shredded lettuce, carrots, cucumber, salt, pepper and a well-seasoned meat, either beef, pork or chicken.  It was seriously the most satisfying sandwiches I ever had.