My rule for any traditional recipe is to keep it simple and stick with the classic!

Afritada is one of many popular everyday entrée dishes in the Philippines.

Picadillo (Spanish pronunciation: [pikaˈðiʎo], “mince”) is a traditional dish in many Latin American countries and the Philippines (where it is known as giniling, and also arroz a la Cubana) that is similar to hash.

This classic comfort food is an easy way to learn how to cook a staple *Filipino cuisine. It has minimal ingredients that you may readily have available in your fridge and pantry.

At first glance this recipe may look intense, but it really isn’t. Don’t be intimidated by how it reads. The only caveat it does require is a few hours of your time.So apparently I had three hours to spare 😆.

Well…here I am!  Back in the cooking game after our 6th move in August.  I will not go into much details …but, I am pretty sure this is THE ONE!

kitchen_2 kitchen_3

Of course, in my new little kitchen, the first meal I made (by request from our teen) was Pork Sinigang (Filipino sour soup or stew).  A staple in any Filipino home, and quite the favorite for many–young and old.  Thus, on the topic of Filipino food, comes the wondrous Pork Adobo

I think my Filipino peers would agree that Tahô, a staple snack in the Philippines brings out the childhood in all of us. I remember this street food dessert as early as 8 years of age. Street vendors would walk around the neighborhood holding two aluminum buckets (The larger bucket carries the tofu base; the smaller bucket holds the arnibal and sago pearls.) that hang on each end of a yoke and carried securely on their shoulder and yelling out “TAHOOOO”–much like the ice cream truck vendors driving around with a looping, cheerful melody that somehow screams out, “ICE CREAM” is coming your way! Come and get some…

Adobo, whether it’s made with chicken, pork, fish, or a vegetarian version with Kangkong (Kangkong has been translated into English as swamp cabbage or river spinach, but those names don’t reflect what kangkong really is except for the fact that it grows where there’s a lot of water. It has also been called swamp morning glory because of its flowers. In French, it is called liseron d’eau.) is a staple in any Filipino household…but how about upping the ante by diversifying it with bacon?!

Pancit or pansit is the term for noodles in Filipino cuisine. Noodles were introduced into the Philippines by the Chinese and have since been adopted into local cuisine.

Pancit palabok and pancit luglug are essentially the same dish, the difference being primarily in the noodles used in the recipe. Luglug uses a thicker noodle than the traditional bihon of a pancit palabok.

This is a simple drink that I grew up with in the Philippines.  There is really not much to making this drink but fruit, water, milk and sugar, yet it’s quite refreshing!  If you Google it, you will see that it’s made in many varieties, depending on everyone’s preference.  I never even realized that you can add milk to it as I have always had it without.  Regardless, below you will find my own, simple recipe for cantaloupe coolers and, perhaps you can put your own twist to this drink, as well 😉  Cheers!-gcc

Family MealA visit to my mom’s house and the old neighborhood in the Bay Area usually means honing in on my Filipino roots. So what I made for you today at my home is Pork Sinigang (Sinigang na Baboy)– Pork ribs and/or riblets with sour broth, daikon, spinach and taro roots, alongside fish sauce for taste in reminiscence of our comfort foods from the Philippines.

Good Afternoon! Last night I ended the evening with ‘50 Shades of Chicken‘, a cookbook parody on my Instagram portfolio… Although this recipe is adapted from a different cookbook: Memories of Philippine Kitchens, this morning I start the day early with my own ‘first shade’ parody of Chicken: RED. Hence, I bring to you a popular dish from the city of Bacolod, Philippines, ‘Chicken Inasal’. This dish uses different ingredients for its marinade and basting sauce that create a unique flavour. Cooking it calls for a constant basting of lemon butter sauce with annatto (a natural plant extract used as dye) which gives it a unique hue of red in colour.

For the love of ‘Sisig’…a Filipino cuisine, considered mainly in our culture as a side dish, or even a snack…along with a bottle of ice-cold beer 😉 The word ‘Sisig’ refers to a method of preparing fish and meat, especially pork, which is marinated in a sour liquid such as lemon juice (kalamansi) or vinegar, then seasoned in salt, pepper and other spices.
What I made for you is Sizzling Pork Sisig alongside Indian Basmati Rice with a vinegar and chili pepper-based dip for the pork.  An easy and versatile recipe you can make, as well!

Coconut Pandesal
Ube Pandesal

Pándesal (Spanish: pan de sal, “salt bread”) is a bread roll made of flour, eggs, yeast, sugar, and salt.

It has become a common food item in the Philippines.[1]  Its taste and texture closely resemble those of the Puerto Rican bread pan de agua and Mexican bolillos. These breads all use a lean type of dough and follow similar techniques learnt from Spaniards or Spanish-trained bakers early in their history.  Despite the Spanish origins of its name, pandesal was introduced in the Philippines in the 16th century.[2] Pandesal originally started out as a plain roll, traditionally served for breakfast and accompanied by butter, cheese, scrambled eggs or filled omelette, sausages, bacon, Spanish sardines, jams, jellies and marmalade, coffee, tea or hot chocolate.

Pandesal can be made from any type of dough and still resemble pandesal as long as the dough is rolled in fine breadcrumbs before baking. The softness of the newer type of pandesal—which consumers unaware of the proper texture now find desirable—is due to a weak dough structure derived from inferior quality flour.

A couple of pandesal variety I made for you are Ube Pandesal and Coconut Pandesal.

Bistek Tagalog is a Philippine dish typically made with onions and strips of sirloin beef slowly cooked in soy sauce, and calamansi juice.  Bistek is considered one of the Philippines’ “national” foods. This is a nice, hearty dish for beef lovers that goes very well with boiled or steamed white rice. Great for a sit-down meal with friends and family.

(Source:  Wikipedia)