My rule for any traditional recipe is to keep it simple and stick with the classic!

A specialty noodle dish in the Philippines smothered with a thick, golden shrimp sauce or other flavored sauce, and topped with: Shrimp, (the size and shell-on or shell-off depending on preference) Crushed or ground pork rind, chicharron, tinapa flakes, scallions, and fried garlic.

This classic comfort food is an easy way to learn how to cook a staple *Filipino cuisine. It has minimal ingredients that you may readily have available in your fridge and pantry.

Adobo, whether it’s made with chicken, pork, fish, or a vegetarian version with Kangkong (Kangkong has been translated into English as swamp cabbage or river spinach, but those names don’t reflect what kangkong really is except for the fact that it grows where there’s a lot of water. It has also been called swamp morning glory because of its flowers. In French, it is called liseron d’eau.) is a staple in any Filipino household…but how about upping the ante by diversifying it with bacon?!

Pancit or pansit is the term for noodles in Filipino cuisine. Noodles were introduced into the Philippines by the Chinese and have since been adopted into local cuisine.

Pancit palabok and pancit luglug are essentially the same dish, the difference being primarily in the noodles used in the recipe. Luglug uses a thicker noodle than the traditional bihon of a pancit palabok.

Family MealA visit to my mom’s house and the old neighborhood in the Bay Area usually means honing in on my Filipino roots. So what I made for you today at my home is Pork Sinigang (Sinigang na Baboy)– Pork ribs and/or riblets with sour broth, daikon, spinach and taro roots, alongside fish sauce for taste in reminiscence of our comfort foods from the Philippines.

Good Afternoon! Last night I ended the evening with ‘50 Shades of Chicken‘, a cookbook parody on my Instagram portfolio… Although this recipe is adapted from a different cookbook: Memories of Philippine Kitchens, this morning I start the day early with my own ‘first shade’ parody of Chicken: RED. Hence, I bring to you a popular dish from the city of Bacolod, Philippines, ‘Chicken Inasal’. This dish uses different ingredients for its marinade and basting sauce that create a unique flavour. Cooking it calls for a constant basting of lemon butter sauce with annatto (a natural plant extract used as dye) which gives it a unique hue of red in colour.

For the love of ‘Sisig’…a Filipino cuisine, considered mainly in our culture as a side dish, or even a snack…along with a bottle of ice-cold beer 😉 The word ‘Sisig’ refers to a method of preparing fish and meat, especially pork, which is marinated in a sour liquid such as lemon juice (kalamansi) or vinegar, then seasoned in salt, pepper and other spices.
What I made for you is Sizzling Pork Sisig alongside Indian Basmati Rice with a vinegar and chili pepper-based dip for the pork.  An easy and versatile recipe you can make, as well!

Bistek Tagalog is a Philippine dish typically made with onions and strips of sirloin beef slowly cooked in soy sauce, and calamansi juice.  Bistek is considered one of the Philippines’ “national” foods. This is a nice, hearty dish for beef lovers that goes very well with boiled or steamed white rice. Great for a sit-down meal with friends and family.

(Source:  Wikipedia)

I do not cook Filipino food often but when I do I go for the gusto!  Moreover, this is the first time I’ve ever cooked a slab of pork fat and I must say I quite enjoyed it.  Today for his lunch break, my 9-year old son had the remainder of last night’s pork belly adobo.  As he took a bite, he closed his eyes and jovially said, “I’m in pork heaven…”

I was really in a mood for cooking another authentic Filipino dish.  So for dinner the other day I made a combination of two of my favourite components (or dishes) and blended the two together making one scrumptious entrée.

I honed in on my native Filipina roots to make an authentic Philippine dish.  This particular recipe does not require banana leaves, but I thought how rustic and comforting it would be for banana leaves aesthetics.  So I made “Paksiw Na Lechón” which in literal translation means “Pork in Liver Sauce”  BUT to make the recipe my way, I substituted the pork for beef oxtails.  And so it is…a 4-6 hour braising process in a dutch oven and not on the stove-top but oven baked.

I’ve only tried to make this recipe once before and love it!  The first time was a semi-success, despite how half of the stuffing came out and the sense of nervousness upon trying out what looked to be a complicated dish.  This time I felt less nervous about making this dish and also bought a slightly larger flank steak.  With all baking aside, one thing you will learn about my style in cooking is that I don’t quite measure anything.  As long as I have all the right ingredients, and even if I didn’t, I just go with the flow of things.  I like to experiment with taste as I imagine most home cooks like me do.  Thus on this note, below is my personal recipe for this classic Filipino dish.