Okay folks, the ‘oven-fried’ concept may be an oxymoron recipe, but it sure beats oil splashing all over my white kitchen and stainless steel stove!  Besides, it’s fast, easy and pretty darn delicious.  Although it is a recipe inspired from Food Network’s Diners, Drive-ins and Dives I didn’t mimic anything but the directions.  Everything else was semi-homemade with the exception of one ingredient.

Simple said.  Simply made…

Onion soups have been popular at least as far back as Roman times. They were, throughout history, seen as food for poor people, as onions were plentiful and easy to grow. The modern version of this soup originates in France in the 18th century,[1] made from beef broth, and caramelized onions. It is often finished by being placed under a grill in a ramekin traditionally with croutons and Gruyère melted on top. The croutons on top is reminiscent of ancient soups

Mexico‘s rich gastronomical heritage is far more diverse than Mexican restaurant fare popular in the United States.  When I think of Mexico I think of my favourite street foods…tacos, taquitos, quesadillas and more!  What better way to hone in on the flavours of Mexico by learning the basics.  Take tortillas, for example.  It’s a staple in most Mexican dishes and I never realized how easy it was to make at home.  There is nothing quite like home-made tortillas.  Once you have mastered it, you’ll never go back to store-bought…

 

Ever in the mood for some down and dirty eating at the comfort of home, of course…well here’s your chance!  I can’t so much give you the exact type of spices I used to marinate the ground turkey because I strongly believe in trying to make things uniquely your own.  Below is just an impromptu guide on the making of this dish.  In the spirit of hunger, I hope you will find it devouring on days when you feel like just being yourself.

In the southern states of Mexico, diners feel the pulse of Mexico’s culinary heart coursing through every meal. In neighbouring Oaxaca, inventive dishes fuel national pride. So on this note, here I am, honing in on a little bit of southern Mexico with some home-made barbacoa! Note that the original recipe calls for 1 1/2 pounds fresh beef brisket. I happened to have about the same size pork butt already set for some awesome recipe…so I used it for this one.

Here’s another great recipe adapted from the art of real food Seasonal Recipes for Every Week of the Year.  I really love meringues as you may have read from my past posts and/or those of you who are following @thecookingapprentice on Instagram!  It’s been a favorite of mine since I was a little girl.  Here’s an easy recipe you will love if you also enjoy pistachios–which is also big in our household!

The ingredients for this recipe were from items I had available in the fridge and pantry to include with the beautiful, grass-fed beef oxtails I recently purchased at our local Whole Foods Market.  I loved the idea that they didn’t trim the tail part of the beef, which made it for an even more adventurous primal way of cooking!  I also love a good crock pot meal, especially knowing that 4 to 6 hours from the time I started I have a comforting meal that awaits my family and me.  I hope you enjoy this particular dish as much as I enjoyed creating it!

Bon Appétit–gcc

I have grown to love the many cookbook collections that surround my home.  One in particular is A Country Cook’s Kitchen by Alison Walker.   From the simple pleasures of making artisanal hearty breads, experiencing the delights of churning butter, making the most of seasonal fruits, enjoying the aroma of freshly baked pastries, biscuits and so much more I have yet to discover…this maybe a great addition to your cookbook collection, as well!

 

Every now and then I miss the sight of seeing my hubby cooking up something French and delicious in our kitchen, so I actually didn’t ask if he wanted to cook lunch, I told him (nicely) to cook lunch.  Originally, wanting to try a new cookbook I found from Home Goods–a favorite pastime hangout of mine that was simple enough to hone into what I call my baby-steps French cooking skills.  I knew the ingredients had chicken, mushrooms, wine, etc. in it but as I referred back to the cookbook, I did not realize that it was Coq au Vin I wanted to make!  And so, as usual, the art of substitution came to play for some of the ingredients that we didn’t readily have available…and once again, created a dish that still retained its originality, but with some personal added touches along the way.